allistaire_dog

A core component of The Bozeman 3’s mission is to support pediatric cancer research.  This includes raising awareness about the need for pediatric cancer research and contributing to it financially.  Every single treatment option for children with cancer is only available because of years of prior research.  Only 50 years ago, the survival rate for children with cancer was only about 20%.  With the advance of cancer research, that number is now over 80%. However, as parents of children with more rare and harder to treat forms of cancer, we know there is still a lot of work to be done.  Additionally, the current treatment options of chemotherapy and radiation come with significant long-term side effects such as infertility, organ damage, cognitive defects, growth defects and secondary cancers.  Because the government, through the National Cancer Institute, only commits 4% of its budget to pediatric cancer research, it is up to private donors to move the research forward and provide better outcomes for children. 

 

CHILDHOOD CANCER STATISTICS

  • Cancer is the number one cause of death by disease of children in the U.S.
  • Cancer claims the lives of more children annually than asthma, muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis & AIDS combined.
  • Less than 4% of the National Cancer Institute’s budget goes to all childhood cancers combined.
  • Two-thirds of pediatric cancer patients will develop long-term side effects, many life-threatening – a result of the treatments that “cured” them.
  • Only four of the 12 most common types of childhood cancers have average survival rates over 80%.
  • 13,500 children in the U.S. are diagnosed with cancer each year.
  • The average age of a cancer diagnosis for an adult is 67 years old, equating to an average of 15 years of life lost to cancer in contrast to the average age of a cancer diagnosis for a child is 6 years old, which equates to an average 71 years of life lost to cancer.

To learn more see:

www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Sites-Types/childhood

www.acco.org