CADEN'S STORY

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In March 2012, three-year-old Caden Shrauger of Bozeman, began complaining of occasional leg pain.  A couple weeks later, he developed a low-grade fever, complaining of neck and hip pain, and became very lethargic.  Blood work showed very high indicators of inflammation and some anemia.  After three nights and numerous scans and tests in Bozeman Deaconess Hospital, an MRI showed abnormalities in the bone marrow of his hips, legs, and spine.

On March 30th, Caden was flown 700 miles from home to Seattle Children's Hospital. The initial fear was leukemia, but a bone marrow test pointed toward another type of cancer – Neuroblastoma.  Caden was diagnosed with Stage 4, High Risk Neuroblastoma, a solid tumor cancer of immature cells within the sympathetic nervous system; it is difficult to treat.

Caden began an aggressive course of treatment on April 7, 2012.  Six rounds of high dose chemotherapy were administered over 5 months.  On July 30, the primary tumor site, his right adrenal gland, was removed.  Slowly, between the associated side effects of vomiting, exhaustion, mouth and throat sores, blood infections, NG feeding tubes, and viruses, Caden’s strength and cheerful, funny nature returned. He began to walk, even run, and play with his sister again.

Scans in late August 2012 revealed that although the cancer was not worse and had been reduced some, it did not respond as well as hoped, nor enough to proceed with the anticipated autologous bone marrow transplant. Caden then completed a seventh round of chemotherapy and traveled to San Francisco for specialized intravenous radiation therapy (I-131 MIBG therapy). This treatment significantly reduced the amount of cancer present, and Caden moved forward into transplant and traditional radiation therapy in early 2013.

In March 2013, he began six months of immunotherapy, including five rounds of difficult inpatient antibody infusions and six rounds of therapy trying to turn the cancer cells (immature nerve cells) into benign, matured nerve cells.  Finally on September 11, 2013, after 17 months of treatment, scans showed that Caden had "no evidence of disease".  He and his family lived in an RV in the hospital’s parking lot for over a year and returned home to Montana.

Less than two months later in November 2013, a very small amount of neuroblastoma was found in his marrow, and he was then considered "relapsed". Caden did six additional rounds of the medication that can mature the neuroblastoma cells into benign ones from home.  During that treatment, he had two sets of "no evidence if disease" scans but the final one again showed a few neuroblastoma cells. When preparing to go to Texas Children’s Hospital for chemo and an infusion of his re-engineered T-cells to target neuroblastoma, his scans inconclusively showed "no evidence of disease" and he became ineligible for that trial but eligible for another trial available through Primary Children's in Salt Lake City.  In July 2014, Caden started on a low intensity drug called DFMO that will hopefully provide a good quality of life and keep his disease at bay. 

He has hearing loss from his treatments and wears hearing aids, but loves kindergarten. He has monthly checkups in Bozeman, a full set of scans and biopsies in Seattle every three months, and checkups in Salt Lake City every three months.